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Workbench face vise

workbench face vise

Essentially a large face vise, this type usually spans most, if not all, of the benchtop's width [Photo J]. Typically, you use two rows of bench. What Do We Want From A Workbench Vice? A face vice should be strong, dependable and quick to use. Fancy often means temperamental, so I'd say. A wood face vise consists of a movable front jaw that is mounted to a broad, square beam that slides in and out of a matching channel. While the. ZOOM HACK LEAGUE OF LEGENDS DOWNLOAD FREE

It feels like the vice has limbered up and is always ready to go. Like a lovely worn in engine. Being able to dictate the layout of your face vice has its benefits. I like to position the guide rail around the same height as the screw, so I can thow in long lengths of wood and balance them level across both these parts. For even longer lengths I can rest them and pivot on the guide while I grab a holdfast for the other end.

Used, abused and just flipping ace! A single wooden screw built in to a face vice on my everyday bench. Wooden screws are a challenge to make, which means they can be pricey and difficult to get hold of. Lake Erie are one that come to mind. And making the tooling is a sod. Even then it takes a lot of time and effort to pull of. Our first wooden screw took many attempts and much wasted timber. Quick release does takes away from the simplicity so may be a little more temperamental, but small metal threads are slow to open, and that mechanism will save you from messing with a lot of winding back and forth.

Any of the big, old iron vices were very good. If you can source one in usable nick, then any brand should suit. This means adding a wooden jaw at the front, and morticing in to the bench top to allow the back jaw of the vice to slip behind. The front of the workbench then becomes the back jaw. These are to prevent the thing from dropping as it opens, and makes a huge difference in use.

Put some suede in the jaw as that way you only need light pressure and it really is the best thing you can do for any vice. Dealing with vice rack. I just love these things, and they certainly make a great option. That is a consideration, but the real reason is due to that limbered up feeling of my worn in vice. The tolerances on a leg vice would have to be tighter in order to work well, so it never quite feels as nice.

Plus I prefer to work in the wider jaw. And for step by step videos on how to build your own traditional workbench, including the PDF plans, check out our English Workbench Online Series. As a professional hand tool woodworker, Richard found hand tools to be the far more efficient solution for a one man workshop.

Richard runs 'The English Woodworker' as an online resource and video education for those looking for a fuss free approach to building fine furniture by hand. Although the shoulder seems like it might get in the way, maybe. Have you put one to the sword before? Hi Rico, again if made with a wooden screw they are beautiful to use. I do love them though. Makes a great traditional face vise or leg vise.

Overall, well worth the money—the entire bench with screw is a fraction of the cost of an oak behemoth. And the dang thing is built like a WW1 tank and kind of looks like one too ,. Blimey, you did really well there! I agree about the importance of looks, and it is probably going to be the most handled tool in your workshop. Great post. Im slowly working my way through your workbench videos, but i never realised how much wooden vices cost!

With the face vise, is that other wooden beam a parallel guide similar to a leg vise? Does it have pins as well, or does it just keep the vise from spinning? I took the liberty of copying your design with the screw offset on the right side and a guide rail on the left with a wedged through mortice and tenon. I am getting pretty fair amount of rack as I try and move the vise in and out.

Have you had a chance to get some pictures of the back side of your apron with the guide rails? I would love to see how you solved this. Also, do you use any lubricant on the wood guide rail to ease the slide? Even older than old Records. Excellent, sounds bloody perfect! They are truly lovely vices, the cracks come from misuse, not use.

Another great bit of advice. Thanks for the all the suggestions Richard; your bench build is in my near future! Recently established a leg vice onto a very country work bench. Never have one before — Joy… bliss even a touch of the sublime! Big metal square cut screw from ancient tractor, and the kind attention from my village Blackie gave me the kit for 10 bucks.

Smooth as silk; complete removal simple ; removable verticle stops each side of the leg and rest pegs for long stuff. Little pressure require for a great hold. Can recommend. Thank you for the nudge. A good vice, a planing spike and a holdfast. That old tractor screw sounds a beast! Your post is timely for me. Spring is coming eventually and I will be able to get into my garage again. I have a small nicholson bench in my bedroom that I use for winter projects. It has a leg vise that I built with a simple metal screw.

I really like having a leg vise and decided that I should finally add vise the the summer bench. I bought another screw, but have been waiting for warmer weather to build a vise. I would really like a leg vise on the summer bench. Unfortunately, the summer bench is legless! Yes, I know it sounds crazy. In order to have a bench in the garage I had to hang it on the wall and collapse it when not in use. I have contemplated building a leg with attached leg vise.

I am sure it would work, but when I collapse the bench, I would have to move the leg every time. That presents its own set of problems. I may just go with a face vise build to save space. On the other hand, I could just keep on without a vise. However, if your going to be legless for much of the year, this I would gently suggest this is bordering on a vice.

I have always found freash air is the answer and an outside winter bench with a tarp may be a possible answer. I can see a face vice making the swing down top too heavy, so the support of the leg could be needed. I need get on with the vise. I am still thinking face versus leg. Face with stow-able leg might be easier to store than leg with leg vise. Now that warm weather is here and the wife wants me to haul a dump truck load of dirt around to the garden beds, I can think on it some more in the meantime!

Just in time for Lie Nielson open house at the factory, 40 miles down the road. Good article and insights. Though it has done nothing to dissuade me from considering a Benchcrafted leg vise. Those seem to appeal to both my head and my heart. Let us know what you opt for. RIchard, How would you install the metal face vise to your bench? Would you inset the face or just bolt it to the front with minimal cutout for the runners and bolted to the bench top?

Or some other way? Do that video. In all the spare time you have. Looking forward to your article on the same Richard. When you say teh tolerances on a leg vice have to be tighter to make it work properly, which elements are you specifically talking about?

The Parallel Guide? I built a bench last year and, after seeing a video that the Unplugged Woodworker posted on making his Nicholson type face vice I knew what I wanted, Unfortunately, the Lake Erie wooden vice kit had become so popular that getting one was going to be a problem…. Len is an engineer who developed a quick release vice mechanism that uses an internal cam to lock the vice solidly in a quarter turn, but allows the vice shaft which is smooth to freely move in and out of its collar with just a quarter turn back.

When I asked him if his VX20 vice kit would work in a single screw Nicholson vice type design, he worked with me and custom modified one of his vice kits to work horizontally, rather than the usual vertical orientation. Can you apply gradual pressure with them or are they on or off? The Hovater vices look excellent — one of the intriguing parts is how they couple the two mechanisms together on their twin screw vices so you can tighten the it with either handle.

I suppose this means you never need to change the your position of your hands when you are tightening it up?. Great text! Bolt or screw this type of face vise onto an existing benchtop in less than an hour. You might have to shim it to flush the jaws with the benchtop and notch the benchtop to align the inner jaw with the edge.

The benchtop's edge or apron typically serves as the inner jaw. A pivoting-jaw vise holds irregular-shape stock without racking the jaws. You also can remove the pivoting jaw for parallel-jaw clamping. Magnet-lined wood jaw pads stay in place without screws. A cast-iron-jaw vise can be recessed into the bottom of a bench for maximum strength and stability. A thick outer jaw distributes clamping force over a wide surface area.

Things to know: A quickrelease jaw lets you move the vise in or out without a lot of turns of the handle. A popup stop on some face vises eliminates the need to drill a doghole in the movable jaw. The longer the handle, the more leverage you can apply to the vise.

But don't get crazy here: Apply only enough force so a workpiece won't budge. Most facevise jaws toe in slightly at the top, then go parallel under pressure. A shoulder vise gives you floor-to-ceiling clamping space between its jaws. A threaded bushing mortised into the vise shoulder unseen keeps the screw on track.

Protruding from the bench edge, this vise can be a bump hazard for your hips and legs. And high humidity could cause the parts to swell and bind. This vise does not easily retrofit to an existing bench. A leg vise moves via a single screw with a pinned sliding guide rail to maintain parallelism.

The guide-rail pin rests against end-grain hard-maple pads that prevent compressing the softer alder leg of this bench. A long mortise accepts the screw and threaded fixture, and the upper guide rail fits in the slot. A lower guide rail, not shown, mounts beneath the jaw.

The tail vise slides back and forth along the guide rails, held in place by the screw assembly. Things to know: You have to space the vise and dogholes around the bench legs and any facevise mounting hardware. You also can hold stock vertically between the movable jaw and the bench.

A quick release, available on some tail vises, speeds up big changes in vise position. Too much clamping force, however, can cause boards to bow up. Retrofitting one to an existing bench typically requires adding material to the benchtop to stay outside the legs or base. The timing chain on a twin-screw end vise syncs the screws. You can adjust either screw should the vise jaws get out of parallel. You can intentionally make the jaws unparallel for clamping irregular-shape workpieces.

Things to know: The bench's apron, or a builtup end of the benchtop, serves as the inner jaw. A twinscrew vise has a large opening between the screws for holding wide stock or assembled drawers. Planing long boards held in the jaws can move the bench sideways.

Instead, capture the workpiece with bench dogs to take advantage of the bench's full mass.

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The biggest issue with the single screw face vise bench vise is that the center portion of the vise is occupied by the screw and runners preventing drop through clamping. The twin screw vise solved this problem but required the arduous operation of two un-connected screws to clamp something.

Later versions of twin screw vises incorporated a chain and sprocket to allow clamping by rotating only one handle. This eliminated the necessity of having a third arm but synchronizing the two handles is difficult. The biggest advantage to the face vise bench vise is the ability to clamp long work on end.

The greater width of the face vise jaw makes it ideal for clamping longer work horizontally to allow the long edges to be worked. The twin handle face vise is ideally suited to dovetailing wider boards because it allows drop through clamping. The most common complaint about face vises bench vise is racking when clamping work that is not centered in the vise.

Shims may be used to create even clamping pressure but this is an inconvenient solution at best. Another complaint about face vises is the metal screw requires grease for ease of operation which can soil the work piece and they require considerable cranking for gross adjustments. The Hovarter Custom face vise mechanism is the only quick action twin shaft mechanism on the market. It utilizes hardened steel smooth clamp shafts instead of threaded rods like other twin screw vise hardware.

When unclamped the vise jaw may quickly and effortlessly be slid in and out to suit the width of the work that needs to be clamped. Once the vise jaw is placed against the work one handle is rotated to clamp the work. You can apply as much or as little force just like a traditional screw. Clamping pressure is applied evenly no matter where the work is placed — no racking. Installation of the VX20F could not be simpler.

Just mount the vise mechanism under the bench top, install bearings in the rear jaw and install the vise jaw and handles. The VX20F can be outfitted with a single metal hand wheel, two hand wheels or a more traditional wooden hub and tommy bar style handle either singly or in tandem.

Pin FB More. Bolt or screw this type of face vise onto an existing benchtop in less than an hour. You might have to shim it to flush the jaws with the benchtop and notch the benchtop to align the inner jaw with the edge. The benchtop's edge or apron typically serves as the inner jaw. A pivoting-jaw vise holds irregular-shape stock without racking the jaws. You also can remove the pivoting jaw for parallel-jaw clamping. Magnet-lined wood jaw pads stay in place without screws. A cast-iron-jaw vise can be recessed into the bottom of a bench for maximum strength and stability.

A thick outer jaw distributes clamping force over a wide surface area. Things to know: A quickrelease jaw lets you move the vise in or out without a lot of turns of the handle. A popup stop on some face vises eliminates the need to drill a doghole in the movable jaw. The longer the handle, the more leverage you can apply to the vise. But don't get crazy here: Apply only enough force so a workpiece won't budge.

Most facevise jaws toe in slightly at the top, then go parallel under pressure. A shoulder vise gives you floor-to-ceiling clamping space between its jaws. A threaded bushing mortised into the vise shoulder unseen keeps the screw on track. Protruding from the bench edge, this vise can be a bump hazard for your hips and legs. And high humidity could cause the parts to swell and bind.

This vise does not easily retrofit to an existing bench. A leg vise moves via a single screw with a pinned sliding guide rail to maintain parallelism. The guide-rail pin rests against end-grain hard-maple pads that prevent compressing the softer alder leg of this bench. A long mortise accepts the screw and threaded fixture, and the upper guide rail fits in the slot.

A lower guide rail, not shown, mounts beneath the jaw. The tail vise slides back and forth along the guide rails, held in place by the screw assembly. Things to know: You have to space the vise and dogholes around the bench legs and any facevise mounting hardware.

You also can hold stock vertically between the movable jaw and the bench. A quick release, available on some tail vises, speeds up big changes in vise position. Too much clamping force, however, can cause boards to bow up. Retrofitting one to an existing bench typically requires adding material to the benchtop to stay outside the legs or base.

The timing chain on a twin-screw end vise syncs the screws. You can adjust either screw should the vise jaws get out of parallel. You can intentionally make the jaws unparallel for clamping irregular-shape workpieces. Things to know: The bench's apron, or a builtup end of the benchtop, serves as the inner jaw.

A twinscrew vise has a large opening between the screws for holding wide stock or assembled drawers. Planing long boards held in the jaws can move the bench sideways.

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Woodcraft 101:How to Install a Face Vise

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workbench face vise

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